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Quad roller skates with outdoor wheels.

8 Best Roller Skate Wheels | Indoor & Outdoor Wheels Reviewed

In this buyer’s guide, we’ve reviewed the 8 best indoor/outdoor roller skate wheels for sale in 2019.

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Type

Indoor (62mm)

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


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Type

Indoor (62mm)

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


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Type

Indoor (59mm)

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐


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Type

Indoor (57mm)

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


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Type

Outdoor (65mm)

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


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Type

Outdoor (66mm)

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


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Type

Outdoor (76mm inline)

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


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Type

Outdoor (62mm)

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐


Contents

Best indoor roller skate wheels

A roller derby match.
Photo by Kristina D.C. Hoeppner licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.

Time to begin our reviews.

In this section, we’ll look at 4 of the best indoor roller skate wheels for sale in 2019.

1. Rollerbones Turbo Speed/Derby Wheels

For all the speed skaters and roller derby pros out there, this wheel has pretty much everything you’d ever want.

First and foremost, Rollerbones have used a super-tough but incredibly lightweight aluminum hub, which makes these wheels super fast but also extremely durable.

Despite their 101A rating, they still offer plenty of grip, even for skaters that weigh less than 150lbs. The urethane heats up with use, allowing it to grab the floor just that little bit extra, without reducing speed. We wouldn’t recommend this wheel for super-slippery surfaces though!

The only real downside to the Turbos is their price – but you definitely get what you pay for.

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Pros

  • Very fast.
  • Still has plenty of grip & stability.
  • Incredibly tough.
  • Extremely lightweight, nimble feel.
  • Cons

  • Expensive, but you get what you pay for.
  • Overall value rating

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

    2. Sure-Grip Zombie Wheels (62mm)

    Looking for something a little less expensive? Or are you a beginner skater after a softer wheel?

    This option from Sure-Grip comes in a few different durometer ratings – 89A, 92A, 95A, and 98A are all available. You can pick the perfect hardness for the rink(s) you skate on, which is great.

    Another thing we like about these wheels for beginners is their price. They’re nowhere near as expensive as the Rollerbones Turbo we just looked at.

    And what’s more, despite being quite reasonably-priced, they still come with aluminum cores. The end result? A lightweight but fast wheel that still has plenty of grip and control.

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    Pros

  • Aluminum core.
  • Great value for money.
  • A few different hardness ratings available.
  • Cons

  • N/A – excellent all-around wheels.
  • Overall value rating

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

    3. Radar Halo (59mm)

    There’s two main things to note about these wheels.

    First of all, they’re smaller in diameter than most other indoor wheels, at 59mm tall. This makes them a little more nimble and improves acceleration, at the cost of reducing your top speed.

    Secondly, they’re much cheaper than the two sets of wheels we’ve reviewed so far. This is because the Halo features a urethane hub, as opposed to an aluminum core.

    Overall, this isn’t the lightest or fastest wheel out there. But what makes it great is its price, agility, and the acceleration it offers. Plus, it’s available in a number of different degrees of hardness, from 87A up to 103A.

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    Pros

  • Great price.
  • Durable.
  • Good acceleration.
  • Nimble due to being short.
  • Cons

  • On the heavy side.
  • Not the best top speed.
  • Overall value rating

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐

    4. Rollerbones Team (57mm)

    As a beginner or intermediate skater looking for a smaller wheel that won’t break the bank, this is a fantastic option.

    At 93A in durometer, it’s perfect for nearly any indoor surface. It also offers a good rebound, making it suitable for recreational/artistic skating as well as roller derby.

    These wheels offer a good balance between grip and slide, but are probably a little slow for experienced skaters.

    However, they more than make up for this with their agility. Despite their hollow hub, these wheels are super lightweight.

    Basically, this is a great option if you’re not sure what to get.

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    Pros

  • Agile and lightweight.
  • Not too fast or hard for beginners.
  • Good price.
  • Works for all different types of skating.
  • Cons

  • A tiny bit too slow for advanced skaters.
  • Overall value rating

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

    Best outdoor roller skate wheels

    Couple skating using inline roller skates.

    Now we’ll take a look at some of the best outdoor roller skate wheels for sale right now.

    5. Moxi Classic (65mm)

    If you’re a beginner looking for maximum grip, or you just like the feeling of skating on really soft wheels, the Moxi Classics are a great fit.

    Sporting a 78A hardness rating, these are nice, soft wheels, making them perfect for really rough skate parks and outdoor rinks.

    Despite this, they’re not easily chipped or cracked. In fact, the urethane exterior and hollow hub design is actually very tough.

    Although the Moxi Classics are very reasonably-priced, they’re probably too slow for most experienced skaters. They’re fantastic for beginners though.

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    Pros

  • Good price.
  • Very durable.
  • Excellent grip outdoors.
  • Great for beginners.
  • Cons

  • For casual use only.
  • Overall value rating

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


    6. Atom Roadhog (66mm)

    These are also 78A outdoor wheels. However, they’re more suitable for experienced skaters due to the speed that they offer.

    For starters, the Roadhog is a little taller than the Moxi Classics we just looked at, making for a greater top speed.

    Secondly, they’re nice and wide, but not too bulky, at 42mm, meaning you can get more wheel on the ground – and go faster. Plus, because they’re not too tall, the acceleration is pretty good too.

    On the whole, if you like how they look, the Roadhogs are a great choice for outdoor skating, even on the toughest of surfaces.

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    Pros

  • Excellent top speed.
  • Great stability.
  • Good acceleration.
  • Works well on nearly any outdoor surface.
  • Cons

  • Only available in neon yellow.
  • Overall value rating

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

    7. Blue Bellies Inline (76mm)

    For inline skaters in particular, dealing with inconsistent surfaces is a particular problem. The last thing you want is to fall over when turning, especially as a beginner.

    These inline wheels are another 78A option. They’re nice and soft, which is great for casual skaters – those who like to ride around the neighborhood to get some exercise for instance.

    However, they might be a bit slow for speed skaters. The grip does reduce your top speed a tiny bit.

    The ride is nice and smooth though, meaning you can focus on where you’re going without having to worry about bumps or wheel wobble. These are also super-durable wheels, and the price is great considering what you get.

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    Pros

  • Nice grip.
  • Great value for money.
  • Tough.
  • Offers a smooth ride.
  • Cons

  • On the slow side due to their softness.
  • Overall value rating

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

    8. Sure-Grip Aerobic (62mm)

    Every wheel we’ve reviewed in this section has been a 78A – except this one.

    As a harder 85A durometer wheel, the Aerobic from Sure-Grip is almost a hybrid. It’s suited to smoother asphalt or polished concrete surfaces.

    On tougher, more uneven surfaces, you will feel the bumps. For advanced skaters though, these wheels offer better maneuverability, especially due to their size. Plus, the price is pretty good.

    The issue with these wheels for beginners is their stability. At 62mm in diameter and only 38mm wide, they’re great for experienced skaters, but not quite stable enough for those who are brand new to skating.

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    Pros

  • Offers good hybrid performance.
  • Nimble – great for pros.
  • Reasonable price.
  • Cons

  • Not great for beginners.
  • Overall value rating

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐

    How to pick the best roller skate wheels

    Quad roller skates with outdoor wheels.

    Now we’ll discuss some key things to consider when choosing roller skate wheels.

    What’s the difference between indoor and outdoor wheels?

    The difference between indoor and outdoor roller skate wheels is how hard they are.

    Indoor wheels are normally very hard, to allow them to roll smoothly on hardwood and other polished surfaces.

    On the other hand, outdoor wheels are quite a bit softer than indoor varieties. This allows them to better absorb shocks, maintain grip, and overcome dirt and debris you might find when skating outdoors.

    Also, outdoor wheels tend to be bigger, because they need to be large enough to overcome obstacles in the road without tipping you over.

    How is hardness measured?

    To determine how suitable (or otherwise) a specific wheel is for your type of surface, you can use its hardness rating, also known as its durometer.

    Roller skate wheels are measured on a scale of 74A (the softest) all the way up to 105A (the hardest).

    Anything from 74A to 80A is recommended for outdoor skating. For indoor rinks, you should use wheels between 90A-105A, depending on how slippery the surface is. The stickier the floor, the higher the durometer you should get.

    Anything in between these two ranges is more of a “hybrid” than an indoor/outdoor wheel. This basically means that it’s suitable for both indoor and outdoor surfaces, but isn’t perfect for either one.

    Hybrids are great for beginners skating indoors, because they allow for better grip, and won’t spin too fast on most surfaces.

    What width of wheel should I get?

    High top quad roller skates.

    Quad roller skate wheels come in different widths, generally in the range of 31 to 44mm.

    The wider the wheel, the more stability you get. However, wider wheels are also heavier, resulting in less agile movement.

    If you’re a beginner on quads, wheels in the 38-44mm range are probably your best bet, as they make it easier to stay upright as you learn the ropes.

    However, more intermediate and advanced skaters will want narrower wheels, as they allow for greater agility and quicker movements.

    What diameter of wheel should I get?

    Apart from the width, you also need to consider the wheel’s diameter.

    This might not seem like such a big deal, but diameters differ a lot by wheel – from 45mm all the way up to 70mm.

    Here’s a quick table showing the main differences between tall and short wheels:

    Smaller wheels have better…

    • Acceleration. Since there’s less wheel to turn, it takes less effort to get them moving.
    • Stability, as there’s less distance between your skate and the rink. However, this is also dependent on wheel width.

    Bigger wheels have better…

    • Roll time. Although it’s easier to get a narrower wheel moving, taller wheels will roll for longer.
    • Top speed. It’s like moving into a higher gear on your car or bike.

     

    I’m doing a specific type of skating – what do I need to know?

    Roller derby players skating.

    Depending on what sort of skating you’re doing, you’ll need a different type of wheel.

    Here’s what each of the common types of roller skating requires in a wheel:

    • Roller derby requires that you can skate fast without falling over. Therefore, you’ll want reasonably soft, grippy wheels that still spin super fast. What you go for depends on how long you’ve played for. Newer roller derby players will want slightly slower, more grippy wheels, but experienced pros often go for 95A+ wheels for a better top speed.
    • Jam skating normally involves similar wheels to what roller derby skaters use. They should be quite balanced – offering good grip but still enough agility to be able to do the full range of moves that this type of skating involves.
    • Artistic skating requires extremely hard, agile (meaning narrow) wheels. This is because it involves large jumps, spins, and pirouettes – being able to launch and turn as quickly as possible is very important.
    • Skate park/bowl skating obviously requires soft, outdoor wheels. However, you also need to consider how durable the wheels are when skating in harsher environments. Just because a wheel is soft, won’t necessarily mean that it’s not going to be tough. In fact, extra softness will make a wheel less brittle and therefore more durable.

    What wheel materials are there?

    Wheels are made up of two different parts – the core or hub in the center, and urethane in the outer.

    While 99% of wheels have urethane in contact with the ground, there are a few different types of material used for the hub. Here are the differences between the most common ones.

    • Aluminum is the strongest core material, but it’s also the most expensive. It’s recommended for experienced skaters, not only because it’s quite costly, but because it offers a stiffer wheel and a much faster roll.
    • Nylon is a slower, cheaper option. It’s less rigid than nylon/hollow cores, generally leading to a less durable wheel. But its slowness makes it better for beginners.
    • Hollow cores are a hybrid of aluminum and nylon options. They’re great for intermediate skaters who want a reasonably-priced wheel that’s not too fast, nor too slow.

    Remember, the hub is used to reduce weight on larger wheels. This is why some wheels don’t need hubs. Therefore, some hollow hubs will also be called “urethane”, because the material is the same as the rest of the wheel.

    Do I also need to buy bearings?

    Roller derby players at the beginning of a jam.
    Photo by Eli Christman licensed under CC-BY-2.0.

    Most roller skate wheels do not come with bearings. Therefore, you will need to find some to use with your skates.

    If you already have bearings, you can use them, but to get the most out of a new set of wheels, it’s always a good idea to get some fresh bearings too.

    Check out our skate bearing buyer’s guide to learn more about what bearings to buy.

    Conclusion

    Remember, if there’s one thing to look at when comparing wheels, it’s the durometer.

    Soft wheels will feel super sluggish indoors, and hard wheels will kill your ankles outdoors. Also, you need the right durometer to provide enough grip as a beginner.

    If in doubt, go towards the middle – don’t buy a 78A wheel unless skating only outdoors, and don’t get a 101A wheel unless you’re only going to be skating on sticky indoor rinks.

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