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Beach volleyball resting on sand.

8 Best Volleyballs In 2019 | For Beach/Outdoor And Indoor Use

Time for a new volleyball?

In this buyer’s guide, we’ve reviewed 8 of the best beach and indoor volleyballs in 2019.

We’ve also laid out some key things to consider when buying, helping you pick the best ball for your specific needs.

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Indoor or outdoor?

Outdoor

Our overall value rating

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Indoor or outdoor?

Outdoor

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐


Image

Indoor or outdoor?

Outdoor

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


Image

Indoor or outdoor?

Outdoor

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


Image

Indoor or outdoor?

Indoor

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


Image

Indoor or outdoor?

Indoor

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


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Indoor or outdoor?

Indoor

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐


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Indoor or outdoor?

Indoor

Our overall value rating

⭐⭐⭐⭐


Contents

Best Beach Volleyballs

Beach volleyball resting on sand.

First, we’ll review some of the best beach/outdoor volleyballs you can buy in 2019.

If you’re after indoor volleyballs instead, click here.

1. Mikasa VLS300 Volleyball

This ball is designed for serious players – it’s the official volleyball of the FIVB and the Olympic games.

The VLS300 can withstand the punishing spikes of the pros, so it’s durable enough for just about any beach matchup. Indeed, it’s completely water-resistant, and the double-cloth backing ensures it won’t lose its shape over time, no matter how hard you use this ball.

But it isn’t just durable – this volleyball is fantastic to play with as well. The soft composite cover has a grippy texture, and the distinctive 10-panel design makes it easier to be accurate when passing and spiking, since it’s slightly rounder than an 18-panel ball.

Remember, for professional-level beach volleyball, they don’t just use any old ball. This thing is engineered to be the best outdoor volleyball that money can buy.

However, this level of control and durability doesn’t come cheap. Expect to pay a decent premium for the VLS300.

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Pros

  • Super durable.
  • Doesn’t get waterlogged.
  • Offers excellent control.
  • FIVB-approved.
  • Cons

  • Expensive, but you get what you pay for.
  • Overall value

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


    2. Spalding King of the Beach Volleyball

    While you might not quite be royalty yourself, this ball will give you a good shot at becoming the reigning champ on the beach.

    This is the official volleyball of its namesake – the King of the Beach tour, as well as the USA Beach Tour. Designed for top-level beach play, it comes with a super-tough construction. It’s designed to withstand water, sandblasting, concrete, and just about anything it could encounter in outdoor play.

    Even slippery conditions won’t stop you from making good contact. The wide seams and 18-panel construction provide great grip and control, so the ball won’t slip when wet.

    If you’re looking for a super weather-resistant ball that plays well in all conditions (including on concrete), this is your best bet.

    However, what we really like about this volleyball is the soft-touch cover. It feels great to play with, but isn’t too soft – making digging and spiking especially satisfying.

    It’s worth mentioning though that the seams are wider than on most other balls, which you do notice when playing. You do get used to this over time.

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    Pros

  • Not too soft, not too hard.
  • Durable.
  • Very water-resistant.
  • Cons

  • Seams feel slightly wide.
  • Overall value

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐


    3. Wilson Soft Play Outdoor Volleyball

    This ball is the perfect choice if you’re looking for something that won’t involve ending the day with stinging forearms.

    Wilson’s Soft Play is meant for families and casual players, because it’s really easy to use and has a super-soft surface.

    The downside to this softer feel is the ball doesn’t quite feel like a pro-level beach volleyball does. You’ll have to hit it harder to get real pace on your serves and spikes. For serious players, the Wilson AVP is probably a better option.

    Although it’s soft, this ball is also durable: the 18-panel shell is machine sewn. Meaning, no more worrying about stitches coming out over time.

    The internals are also well-designed. Wilson’s bladder does a fantastic job maintaining its shape, especially considering that the outer shell has so much give to it.

    Best of all, it’s very reasonably priced, and even comes with that all-white Top Gun look.

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    Pros

  • Fantastic for kids and casual players.
  • Maintains its shape nicely.
  • Bulletproof stitching.
  • Great price.
  • Cons

  • Too soft for competitive play.
  • Overall value

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


    4. Wilson AVP Official Beach Volleyball

    Wilson’s answer to the Spalding King of the Beach volleyball has many of the same features. But it also has a few more tricks up its sleeve.

    Like the King of the Beach, the AVP is great in basically any weather conditions. However, it doesn’t have major gaps in the seams, making for a fantastic-feeling ball.

    Speaking of feel, the response of this volleyball is almost to die for. It provides the perfect amount of spring, without feeling like a super high-bounce ball. If you love to spike, you’ll love this ball.

    Because it performs so well, the AVP is pricey, but not quite as expensive as some other pro-level beach volleyballs.

    In addition to looking nice, the patterned design provides excellent spin and flight path detection, even when you’re dealing with glare. As a result, you can more accurately predict where the ball is headed and position yourself to get there in time, making it easier to set up a killer return.

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    Pros

  • Tough as nails.
  • Feels just like an outdoor volleyball should.
  • Patterning allows you to see the flight of the ball as early as possible.
  • Perfect amount of bounce.
  • Cons

  • A little expensive, but not unreasonable.
  • Overall value

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


    Best Indoor Volleyballs

    Volleyball player spiking an indoor volleyball.

    Next, we’ll take a look at some of the best indoor volleyballs on the market right now.

    5. Tachikara SensiTec Volleyball

    If you’re concerned about the visibility of your ball in-flight, then this is a great option. Available in over 30 different color combinations, the SensiTec is vibrant enough that you’ll never miss it on tough backdrops (like a cheering crowd!).

    Tachikara have engineered incredibly low-profile seams, resulting in minuscule gaps and giving you a nice feel for the ball. As a competition-grade volleyball, the SensiTec plays great – it has a nice springy shell which isn’t too hard on the hands.

    In addition, the ball features Tachikara’s “loose bladder” construction. This allows a thin layer of air to circulate between the inside bladder and the layer of canvas reinforcement panels that support the outside cover. This system further improves the response of the ball, and ensures it has a 360-degree sweet spot – no matter where you touch the ball, the surface feels the same.

    The downside of this construction is that if the bladder gets damaged over time, the ball can wobble a bit in flight. Overall however, the SensiTec is a durable ball, and this issue is quite a rare occurrence.

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    Pros

  • Heaps of colors on offer.
  • 360-degree sweet spot.
  • Springy shell, but not too hard.
  • Durable.
  • Cons

  • Flight will be affected if the bladder gets knocked off-center.
  • Overall value

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


    6. Molten FLISTATEC Volleyball

    Molten has taken in-flight consistency to the next level with this indoor volleyball.

    The outer shell of the FLISTATEC is designed to use in-flight air currents around the ball to keep it stable and reduce turbulence. This ensures that your sets and overhand passes are more accurate – no more “knuckle” or wobble in flight.

    Essentially, this technology works because of the textured cover. Since the ball is less slippery, there’s less tendency for the air currents to lose their “grip” on the ball and have it drop or move suddenly. Plus, this design also offers you better grip as a player, making it easier to make a solid contact on the ball.

    The cover also boasts an iconic panel design that results in smoother-looking spin. The panels’ contrasting colors make the ball easily visible in-flight, though it’s only available in two color combinations.

    As an NCAA-approved volleyball, this option comes with a more traditional bladder design than the Tachikara SensiTec we just looked at. As a result, you don’t have to worry about balance issues. This ball is so durable in fact that it comes with a 2-year warranty for indoor use.

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    Pros

  • Super consistent in flight.
  • Looks great – spin is easily visible.
  • 2-year warranty.
  • Offers great grip.
  • Cons

  • N/A – one of the best indoor volleyballs out there.
  • Overall value

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐


    7. Mikasa VQ2000 Volleyball

    There are fancier volleyballs on the market, but if you’re looking for a reasonably-priced ball that will last for years, the VQ2000 is an excellent choice.

    The ball’s longevity is thanks to the design of the internals. It’s built around the philosophy of an even weight distribution, meaning, the ball never becomes unbalanced over time. It also has a fabric-wrapped center, providing extra protection for the butyl bladder.

    For even greater control, the ultra-soft composite leather cover has a tacky grip that makes it incredibly easy to handle. The ball is soft without being squishy, so you both get comfort and power.

    This all combines to make the VQ2000 a great option for the majority of players. However, while it’s great value for money, the VQ2000 is not quite a competition-level ball. It’s a bit slow in the air, and just doesn’t feel the same as a top-of-the-line volleyball.

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    Pros

  • Reasonable price.
  • Durable bladder.
  • Soft, tacky outer layer.
  • Cons

  • Not quite competition-grade.
  • Overall value

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐


    8. Molten L2 Competition Volleyball

    The L2 is designed to withstand the rigors of competitive play/practice. It can be thrashed on indoor surfaces, no problem at all. While it’s not quite as well-made as the FLISTATEC, this is a solid, well-designed ball – perfect for youth/high school players in particular.

    While both balls are well-made, the L2 features a cotton-wrapped construction, while the FLISTATEC is nylon-wrapped. Additionally, the L2’s cover is made of microfiber composite leather, as opposed to the FLISTATEC’s slightly nicer premium composite.

    However, the cover still provides an impressively soft touch that takes the sting out of the game, making this ball great for youth players.

    The L2 also features a single-piece butyl bladder. Since there are no seams internally, this bladder stays inflated for absolutely ages. Meaning, no need to grab your pump after each and every game.

    Overall, this is a great all-purpose ball that will get the job done, without any extra bells and whistles. It feels pretty good considering what it costs, but isn’t quite up to the standard of the best indoor volleyballs out there.

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    Pros

  • Soft feel.
  • Good price.
  • Stays inflated for absolutely ages.
  • Cons

  • Just doesn’t have that premium feel.
  • Overall value

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐


    Volleyball Buyer’s Guide

    Girl holding an indoor volleyball.

    To help you pick the right volleyball for your game, we’ve outlined a few key factors to consider before buying.

    If you buy the right ball, it’ll last a lifetime. This is why it’s important to consider what you actually need before pulling the trigger.

    1. The difference between beach and indoor volleyballs

    The first thing to consider is where you’ll be playing. There are some important differences between indoor and outdoor balls.

    Indoor volleyballs

    Mikasa indoor volleyball on a gym floor.

    The difference between indoor and outdoor balls is the materials they’re made of, and how they’re designed.

    Indoor volleyballs normally have a dimpled outer, and molded panels. This means the panels are glued to an inner lining, which gives the seams a smooth appearance. Having a smooth surface makes the ball easier to hit accurately, but the bumps/dimples give you enough grip to get a solid contact on the ball.

    They’re also usually lighter and softer than outdoor volleyballs. This is because they don’t need to be as durable or as heavy, since they’ll just be hitting a gym floor instead of sand or water, and don’t have to contend with wind.

    Thanks to their softer shell and lightweight design, indoor balls are easier on the hands and forearms. This is why they’re a better choice for beginners. However, you need to ensure that the ball can withstand the environment you’ll be playing in.

    Outdoor volleyballs

    Wilson volleyball resting on sand.

    On the other hand, outdoor volleyballs balls are built to withstand the elements. Since they’re meant to be used outside on surfaces like concrete, dirt, or sand, they’re designed to be incredibly durable.

    Instead of being made of leather like the indoor models, outdoor balls are made of water-resistant composite materials. This prevents them from getting waterlogged or destroyed if you play in the rain, or if they end up in the ocean.

    The surface of the ball is also different on an outdoor volleyball. Instead of being molded, outdoor volleyballs are made up of panels that are sewn together. The stitching adds even more durability, but also makes the ball heavier.

    Weight is important for outdoor balls though, because being heavier helps prevent them from blowing in the wind too much. No one wants their perfect ace to be blown just out of bounds.

    If you’re going to be practicing with the ball very frequently, an outdoor ball is a good choice regardless of where you’ll be playing because it will last longer. Plus, it will get your arms and wrists used to harder hits, making indoor balls seem tame in comparison.

    2. How to find a durable volleyball

    Teenagers playing volleyball on a beach.

    A volleyball is essentially made of two parts – these are the two main failure points.

    1. The outer cover. If the seams (whether glued or stitched) begin to come apart, you’re going to be in a lot of trouble. The best volleyballs in terms of durability are normally the officially-approved ones. However, they do tend to be more expensive. The thing is, if kids are going to be using the ball, or you’ll just be using it casually on occasion, the cover is unlikely to split for a number of years at least. But it’s much more important to get a volleyball with a tough outer shell if you take your volleyball seriously.
    2. The bladder of the volleyball is also important. However, when assessing the bladders on different balls, it doesn’t really matter how you’ll be using the ball, since the bladder doesn’t take the brunt of the impacts. If it leaks, it’s very difficult to fix. Look for a single-piece butyl bladder, with no seams for air to potentially begin leaking out of as the ball gets older.

    To really see how durable a volleyball is, have a look at reviews from people who have owned and used the specific volleyball for a number of years.

    Outdoor volleyballs also tend to be tougher because they have to withstand harsher playing conditions.

    3. What weight should I get?

    The weight of the ball is important because it affects several aspects of how it plays.

    First, a lighter ball will move more slowly in the air, which gives you more time to get into position. This can be especially helpful for beginner players who are still learning the basics of volleyball.

    Secondly, the lighter the ball, the easier it is on the wrists and arms. Again, this is a better choice for more inexperienced or younger players who are still getting used to the force of the ball.

    Look for the word “underweight” if you want something a little lighter.

    4. What size should I get?

    Indoor volleyball player setting the ball.

    Volleyballs come in different sizes, but if you’re going to be playing in tournaments or school leagues, it’s better to choose a regulation-size ball, even for practice. This will get you used to playing with the correct size.

    If you’re just playing for fun, there aren’t any rules about which size you should use. Typically though, the regulation size offers the best experience.

    However, you may want to consider “oversized” volleyballs for younger kids under the age of 12, as they’re easier to use.

    Here is the official size chart, based on FIVB regulations, which we’ll discuss more below. Note that outdoor volleyballs may actually be slightly bigger than the indoor varieties.

    Volleyball size (circumference and mass) chart.

    5. Padding and feel

    These days, there are volleyballs for sale specifically designed to be extra-soft. Essentially, they’re made for casual players and kids who don’t want a particularly fast-paced game, or who want to avoid balls that hurt to use.

    However, there’s a balance to achieve here. If a ball is too squishy, you’ll struggle to get real power on it.

    If you’re a volleyball veteran, you’re probably used to playing with fairly hard volleyballs. Don’t be tempted to go for anything softer, because it will feel slow.

    6. Does color matter?

    Beach volleyball player spiking the ball.

    When it comes to volleyballs, color is more than just an aesthetic consideration.

    If you’re playing outdoors in fading light, you’ll want to ensure you can still see the ball. Look for a ball that is as bright as possible – a color like neon yellow or green. These sorts of designs stand out against dark backdrops like the night sky.

    White is an option as well, but can get lost in the glare of the sun on occasion.

    Indoors, the level of differentiation between the colors used is more important than having a bright ball. This is because you need to be able to pick the volleyball out from a variety of different-colored backgrounds, rather than having to spot it in darkness.

    7. Volleyball regulations

    If you’re going to be playing in a league or competitive tournaments, be sure to select a volleyball that has the applicable approval.

    First, find out what balls you use in your matches. If you can’t find the exact model, look for a similar ball approved by the relevant body.

    • The FIVB has a very strict technical document outlining the exact characteristics of its approved balls. Their rules are probably the most strict.
    • The NCAA outlines the specifications for men’s and women’s‘ volleyballs separately in its broader rulebook for each classification of the sport. You’ll find the relevant section under rule 3.

    If you’re unsure, ask someone from your league’s governing body what specification of balls you’re allowed to use. Typically, for recreational leagues, they will just use the NCAA standard for indoor volleyballs. Outdoor volleyball is a little more of a mixed bag, unless playing at an elite level.

    Conclusion

    The most important thing to consider is how the volleyball is actually going to feel as you use it.

    You want just the right amount of cushioning to make the ball comfortable. But, especially as a serious competitor, you don’t want something too soft, or your spikes will be lacking in power.

    Remember that most volleyballs bought online can be returned, no questions asked. So don’t be afraid to try a few different options – just check the return policy first.

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