What Is My Pickleball Rating?

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USA Pickleball has a rating system that allows people to gauge how ‘good’ they are at pickleball. The rating system has various criteria that pickleball players can check themselves against. While the skill rating doesn’t really mean anything in the grand scheme of things, a lot of players do use the ratings to determine which players are going to give them a good, competitive game. So, if you areas king ‘what is my pickleball rating?’, then read on!

What Is My Pickleball Rating?

What Is My Pickleball Rating

USA Pickleball seems to be the only pickleball organization that provides ratings for its players.

If you play under the USA Pickleball banner, then you will be given a rating. However, not everybody is going to get to this point.

If you join a pickleball club, they can rate you. However, you can also use the following criteria to rate yourself. Do bear in mind that the criteria are fairly broad. If you are looking to play a game of pickleball, then you should always aim to find a player that has a similar pickleball rating to you.

1.0 and 2.0 Ratings

This is the rating given to people that are new to the game. These people are very new to the rules of pickleball, and they may not be able to hit the right shots. In fact, they may struggle to score points. If you have a rating of 1.0 or 2.0, then you are at the start of your journey.

2.5 Rating

When you start to gain a bit of experience, know how to keep score and can be fairly competitive against similar players, you will have a 2.5 rating. This is barely a step up from being new to the game.

3.0 Rating

When you start getting into the 3.0 rating category, your shots are going to be analyzed. You will have a solid understanding of the rules at this point. Your main aim is to be working on improving your game on the court.

Your forehand, backhand, and serves are starting to come together. However, you will not be able to consistently hit the shots that you want to make. In fact, your shots may be going off in wildly unpredictable directions.

You may struggle to hit dink shots, but you understand the basics of them.

If you have a 3.0 rating, then you may be ready to play in some basic tournaments.

3.5 Rating

3.5 Rating

At the 3.5 rating, you will have started to develop more consistency in your shots. You may also be learning more of when to use a particular shot, and when you should be avoiding it.

Your dinks are still not going to be perfect, but they are getting there. You should be able to hold a consistent rally with some similarly rated players.

The real big change between the 3.0 rating and the 3.5 rating will be the third shot. At this level, you will have started to develop your drop shot. You may not always be able to nail the drop shot, but you are certainly getting to the point where you are gaining a bit of consistency with it.

Your rallies will be starting to get longer, and you will know a lot more about how to position yourself on the court. Players with a 3.5 ranking are starting to become much speedier players, and they will know how to move into the right position to return a shot.

4.0 Rating

This is when your skills are really starting to come together. Both your forehand and backhand can be hit with a reasonable amount of consistency now. You don’t have the timing of the shots down perfectly, but you are getting there.

Your dinks are coming closer to perfection. You may not be able to hold longer rallies yet, but you should be able to have a reasonable amount of success playing with with the dinks.

The third shot is much better too. The drop shot is not perfect, but you should be able to hit it with some consistency. However, those at the 4.0 rating will know that the drop shot isn’t always the best third shot to play, so they are starting to mix up their shots a little bit, just to try something completely different on the court.

Positioning is really coming along at this stage. The 4.0 rating is heavily based on a player’s ability to capitalize on the weakness of their opponents.

4.5 Rating

4.5 Rating

The 4.5 rating is given to consistent players. They will know when to use the right shots. Their drop shot will barely ever be returned, and long dinking rallies can be sustained by the player.

The 4.5 volley is going to be almost perfect. A player can hit the volley with ease, and they will be able to consistently hit it towards their opponent’s feet.

A player at the 4.5 rating is able to easily transition from defensive to offensive play.

5.0 Rating

The 5.0 rating comes when the player is consistent in everything that they do when they are playing pickleball. They have positioning perfect. They know when to hit the right shots. They know how to return their opponent’s shots with ease. Anybody that is sitting in the 5.0 ranking is going to be entered into some pretty big tournaments.

5.5 Rating and Above

Anything above the 5.5 ranking is reserved for the players playing on the pro circuit. You would need to have multiple tournaments wins under your belt for this one.

Final Thoughts

If you are asking ‘what is my pickleball rating?’, we suggest that you join a pickleball club. They will give you a ranking based on how well you play. It is important that you know what your pickleball rating is because it will allow you to play against similarly skilled players, which is just going to be a lot more fun for you and your opponent.

FAQs

How Do I Find My Pickleball Rating?

If you are a member of USA Pickleball, you can login to your USA Pickleball account, and the rating will be listed there.

What Makes An Intermediate Pickleball Player?

If you are rated between 3.0 and 3.7, you are classed as an intermediate pickleball player. It means that the foundation of your game is there, but you aren’t consistent in everything that you do.

What is a 3.5 Pickleball Player?

A 3.5 pickleball player is classed as ‘decent’. They are not pro level, but they can certainly enter some minor competitions.

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